Overview of Traditional and Reverse Shoulder Replacement

Total Shoulder Replacement (Traditional and Reverse)

Total shoulder replacement is a surgery for those who have a severe cuff care. This replacement can result in pain and limited motion but for some patients may be the only solution. total shoulder replacements is a process which utilizes a plastic cup fit into your shoulder socket joint and a metal ball to represent the ball, in the ball and socket joint. These two items replace your existing ball and socket joint to provide better functionality and movement.

Who qualifies for a total shoulder replacement?

Total shoulder replacement is only recommended if you have endstage shoulder arthritis that cannot be repaired through any other means. It can also be recommended for people who have a cuff tear arthropathy, or those who have had a previous shoulder replacement surgery that was unsuccessful. People who experienced severe shoulder pain and have tried all other nonsurgical treatments but found no relief may also be candidates for the surgical procedure.

What happens during surgery?

This procedure replaces your ball and socket joint with the artificial ball and socket joint. It takes about two hours to complete. During the procedure your surgeon will make an incision on the front of your shoulder or the top of your shoulder. Through this incision they will remove the damaged phone and position your new components inside in order to restore function to your shoulder.

Surgical complications

This is a highly technical procedure and your surgeon will evaluate your situation carefully before you are approved. There can be a loosening or dislocation of the replacement components as well. If this occurs, the new shoulder joint may need to be re-operated.

Recovery

After your surgical procedure your medical team will give you antibiotics in order to prevent an infection as well as pain medication. Many patients can get out of bed today after their surgery and eat solid food. Typically you will be discharged from the hospital and able to go home on the third day. When you leave you will have to keep your arm in a sling and follow the instructions of your surgeon diligently.

You will also have to craft a formal physical therapy program with your surgeon in order to improve the flexibility and strength in your new shoulder. You may need somebody with you for the first few weeks following your surgery, but after two weeks you should be able to eat on your own and dress on your own. You may also be asked to return to your surgeon’s office for x-rays in order to monitor the success rate of your new shoulder.

What can I do after surgery and what can’t I do?

You have to follow the exercise program prescribed by your Los Angeles shoulder surgeon. You should avoid any extreme arm positions for at least six weeks. You should not lift anything heavier than 5 pounds for the first six weeks. You should not push yourself out of a chair or out of bed. And you should not participate in any repetitive heavy lifting movements after this surgery.

References:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00094

http://www.hss.edu/conditions_Shoulder-Replacement-Surgery-Diagnosis-Treatment-Recovery.asp#.VNxzCPnF9QA

By | 2018-05-22T17:03:13+00:00 April 20th, 2015|Shoulder Surgery|Comments Off on Overview of Traditional and Reverse Shoulder Replacement