Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery

How does minimally invasive hip surgery work?

Hip replacement surgery aims at restoring function to a damaged hip. It entails the replacement of all or part of the anatomical structures that form the joint. A normal hip joint is composed of the head of the thigh which articulates with the acetabulum, a socket within the hip bone. This forms a “ball and socket” type of joint that gives room for the head to move in various directions hence allowing for the wide range of movement that a person can achieve using the hip.

minimally-invasive-hip-surgery Prosthetics that have been manufactured are similar to the natural anatomical components of the hip joint. During surgery, the diseased portions of the joint are removed and replaced with prosthetics. Though adequate function returns to the hip joint, a person may still be limited in the activities that they are able to perform after the surgery. While excellent, a hip replacement will never be as good as what you were born with.

Traditionally, hip replacement surgery has been performed through the open technique. This is where the Beverly Hills orthopedic surgeon makes a large incision about 10-12 inches on the lateral (outside) aspect of the joint and opens up the damaged joint. It allows for easy replacement of the damaged parts and once done, the surgeon closes up the hip joint and the tissues are sutured together and the patient is sent to recovery.

The traditional technique has been associated with a longer post operative stay in the hospital, delayed return of function and increased blood loss during the procedure. The large incision also contributes to a poor cosmetic outcome. This prompted the doctors to come up with a better technique and the minimally invasive hip surgery technique was developed.

canstockphoto1873961-300x199In this new technique, a smaller incision about 3-6 inches long is made in the back, side or front of the hip joint. The Los Angeles orthopedic surgeon often utilizes arthroscopy so as to visualize structures within the hip joint. Arthroscopy entails the use of cameras that project images onto a screen.

The surgeon is able to remove portions of damaged bone and introduce the prosthetics through the small incision. The prosthetics used are similar to those used in the conventional type of surgery. The technique saves the muscles from damage and is associated with less post operative pain, a faster return to function and better overall outcomes for the patient.

The procedure is ideal for younger and thin patients. It demands skill and experience from the orthopedic surgeon in Beverly Hills, and a patient is advised to seek a surgeon with a successful history at performing the procedure. Because of the limited field of view that the technique offers, it may not be ideal for obese patient, those with severe hip damage and those who have had prior surgery performed in the hip joint.

References.

1.ww.nlm.nih.gov.

2. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00404